My Blog

Posts for tag: Running

By Pill Hill Podiatry Group
July 05, 2017
Category: Foot Health

Running Foot Pain

Your feet are made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, 112 ligaments and a vast network of tendons, nerves and blood vessels. Each of these parts works in harmony, enabling you to walk, run and jump normally and without pain.  

But before jumping into a rigorous workout or fitness program that involves running, you may want to give your feet some extra attention, starting with a trip to your podiatrist. A professional podiatrist can properly examine your feet, detect potential problems, and provide tips for injury-free training and shoe selection.

Beginning runners are not the only ones who should see a podiatrist. Frequent runners should also pay their podiatrist a visit from time to time to check for any stress on the lower extremities brought on by repetitive force.

Common injuries experienced by runners include plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, Achilles tendonitis and stress fractures.

Helpful Tips for Preventing Injury

In addition to visiting our office, you can also prevent injuries that commonly occur during training and running by stretching properly, choosing appropriate footwear, and paying attention to pain or signs of an injury.

Stretch

To prevent injury to your lower extremities, it’s important to stretch carefully before beginning any workout regimen. When muscles are properly warmed up and stretched, the risk for injury is greatly reduced. Appropriate stretches include stretching of the hamstring and wall push-ups.

Choose Proper Footwear

The type of shoe you should wear also plays an important role in your ability to run without pain and with optimal performance. The shoe that your foot requires will depend on your foot structure and function, your body type, and the type of running or workout regimen you are interested in. Your podiatrist may also prescribe an orthotic, or shoe insert, to alleviate any foot pain or anomalies.

Be Mindful of Injuries

Even with proper footwear and stretching, not all foot problems can be prevented. Whenever you experience pain, stop whatever workout you are doing and rest. As pain subsides, gradually increase exercise with caution. When pain persists, visit our office for a proper evaluation.

New joggers and seasoned runners alike should take the necessary steps to avoid injury to the lower limbs. Consult with your podiatrist before starting any new workout, and always seek professional care when pain or injury occurs.

By Pill Hill Podiatry Group
February 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Marathon Training   Running  

marathon runningWhether you’re training for your very first marathon or preparing for your 10th, it’s important to begin your training program on the right foot. A lack of experience coupled with the repetitive impact placed on the feet and ankles during a long run can produce enough stress to cause hairline fractures and other debilitating foot injuries.

Many foot problems seen in marathoners are caused by the repetitive pounding over the months of long-distance running. With some people, injury is triggered by the abnormal foot biomechanics, and in others it is because of poor training. During a 10-mile run, the feet make about 15,000 strikes, at a force of three to four times the body's weight. Even if you have perfect foot mechanics, injuries and pain are often unavoidable with this amount of stress.  

To prevent injury during training, it’s important to pay close attention to your feet.  When increasing mileage, avoid doing so too quickly. The increased forced can make your feet more susceptible to stress fractures.

Basic tips for training include:

  • Follow a training schedule that is appropriate for your experience level
  • Start easy and increase your mileage slowly
  • Stretch and warm up properly to reduce strain on muscles, tendons and joints
  • Choose appropriate footwear based on your foot structure, function, body type, running environment and training regimen
  • Never ignore pain. If the pain gets worse with reduced exercise and rest, stop training and visit your podiatrist

Aside from stress fractures which often occur from overtraining, additional foot problems you may experience include:

  • Toenail problems, including ingrown and fungus
  • Heel pain, such as plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendon and calf pain
  • Toe pain, such as bunions
  • Shin splints

Before you start training, our practice recommends visiting a podiatrist for a complete evaluation of your lower extremities. Our office will examine your feet and identify potential problems, discuss training tactics, prescribe an orthotic device that fits into a running shoe (if needed) and recommend the best style of footwear for your feet to allow for injury free training all the way up to your race day. It is especially important to come in for an exam if you have already started training and are experiencing foot or ankle pain.  

Training for a marathon is hard work. It takes time and dedication. At our practice, we offer special interest and expertise working with marathoners to ensure good foot health throughout your entire training program to help you achieve your goals.